"Throughout the many poems about New Haven, his home, Greene contrasts the ordinary or sinister life of the city with the rarefied atmosphere of the university, to telling effect. . . His poetry is suffused with what used to be called 'social conscience.' Although Wallace Stevens seems to be his master, I am reminded of the poems of James Wright, but without a trace of sentimentality. And there is something about Greene's tone of voice — almost casual, yet informed by the closest kind of observation. This is lovely writing, precise observation, tender yet realistic. I admire these poems and recommend them." — from the Foreword