News of the World

A superb new collection from “a great American poet . . . still at work on his almost-song of himself” (The New York Times Book Review).In both lively prose poems and more formal verse, Philip Levine brings us news from everywhere: from Detroit, where exhausted workers try to find a decent breakfast after the late shift, and Henry Ford, “supremely bored” in his mansion, clocks in at one of his plants . . . from Spain,...

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The Names of the Lost

After reading The Names of The Lost by Philip Levine, my perspective on poetry has changed.I am not the biggest poetry fan in the world.I particularly like writing prose.However, after reading the poetry of Philip Levine, I have found a new understanding for the genre.I know that not all poetry or poets for that matter are the same, but there usually is a point where I see a common ground that all poets have.However, there was something...

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7 years from somewhere

Philip Levine (b. January 10, 1928, Detroit, Michigan. d. February 14, 2015, Fresno, California) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American poet best known for his poems about working-class Detroit. He taught for over thirty years at the English Department of California State University, Fresno and held teaching positions at other universities as well. He is appointed to serve as the Poet Laureate of the United States for...

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Unselected Poems

Philip Levine (b. January 10, 1928, Detroit, Michigan. d. February 14, 2015, Fresno, California) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American poet best known for his poems about working-class Detroit. He taught for over thirty years at the English Department of California State University, Fresno and held teaching positions at other universities as well. He is appointed to serve as the Poet Laureate of the United States for...

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So Ask

I really liked and learned a lot from this collection of the writings and thoughts of the poet, Philip Levine.His meditations, particularly in the interviews at the end, on writing were very helpful.It’s interesting to contrast this with the book I read earlier “Don’t Ask.”It was a similar type of collection, except I found him very grumpy.In this he is very sweet and thoughtful.Both of them hold both his intellect and his passion, but I found...

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They Feed They Lion & The Names of the Lost

A major reissue in one volume of two early books by one of our finest living poets. In an essay on his career, Edward Hirsch describes They Feed They Lion as his "most eloquent book of industrial Detroit . . . The magisterial title poem--with its fierce diction and driving rhythms--is Levine's hymn to communal rage, to acting in unison." Of The Names of the Lost: "In these poems Levine explicitly links the people of his...

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One for the Rose

Philip Levine (b. January 10, 1928, Detroit, Michigan. d. February 14, 2015, Fresno, California) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American poet best known for his poems about working-class Detroit. He taught for over thirty years at the English Department of California State University, Fresno and held teaching positions at other universities as well. He is appointed to serve as the Poet Laureate of the United States for...

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