The Harlem Cycle (Harlem Cycle, #1-3)

The books of the Harlem Cycle, starting with A Rage In Harlem, are classic examples of the genre – there are hard-bitten characters in extreme circumstances, vain and bloody murder and reluctant witnesses, twisted and arbitrary morality, vested interests corrupting the unfolding of justice and above all there’s Himes’ particular take on the poetry of pulp fiction. The effusive metaphor is a staple of the genre and the evocative analogies drawn...

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The Harlem Cycle Vol 3 (Harlem Cycle, #7-9)

Chester Bomar Himes began writing in the early 1930s while serving a prison sentence for armed robbery. From there, he produced short stories for periodicals such as Esquire and Abbott's Monthly. When released, he focussed on semi-autobiographical protest novels. In 1953, Himes emigrated to France, where he was approached by Marcel Duhamel of Gallimard to write a detective series for Série Noire, which had published works...

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The Crazy Kill (Harlem Cycle, #3)

Love and jealousy erupt into violence in The Crazy Kill, a classic thriller in Chester Himes's trailblazing Harlem Detectives series.  One early morning, Reverend Short is watching from his bedroom window as the A&P across the street is robbed. As he tries to see the thief get away, the opium-addicted preacher leans too far and falls out--but he is unscathed, thanks to an enormous bread basket outside the bakery...

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Lonely Crusade

Though he's well known for his crime and detective novels, Chester Himes wrote two works of political, social realist fiction early in his career. Lonely Crusade, his second novel, drew comparisons to Dostoevsky and praise from James Baldwin but also suffered a critical drubbing from the mainstream press. A commercial failure as well, the novel was hated by both the right-wing and left-wing establishment for Himes' honest depiction of how a...

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