Mack Made Movies

I've become a big fan of Don Brown. He takes historical figures - often people not-particularly-well-known - and writes good, comprehensive, easy-to-understand picture books on them.The artwork is simple and distinctive (not overly bright and colorful, though - I find this restful, some people find it boring), and the well-researched books are enlivened by actual quotes by the hero in question.This one is about a pioneer of the...

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Henry and the Cannons

Before Washington crossed the Delaware, Henry Knox crossed Massachusetts in winter—with 59 cannons in tow.In 1775 in the dead of winter, a bookseller named Henry Knox dragged 59 cannons from Fort Ticonderoga to Boston—225 miles of lakes, forest, mountains, and few roads. It was a feat of remarkable ingenuity and determination and one of the most remarkable stories of the revolutionary war. Here the perils and adventure of his journey...

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A Wizard from the Start

A wizard from the start, Thomas Edison had a thirst for knowledge, taste for mischief, and hunger for discovery—but his success was made possible by his boundless energy. At age fourteen he coined his personal motto: “The More to do, the more to be done,” and then went out and did: picking up skills and knowledge at every turn. When learning about things that existed wasn't enough, he dreamed up new inventions to improve the...

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One Giant Leap

As a young boy, Neil Armstrong had a recurring dream in which he held his breath and floated high in the sky. He spent his free time reading stacks of flying magazines, building model airplanes, and staring through a homemade telescope. As a teenager, Neil worked odd jobs to pay for flying lessons at a nearby airport. He earned his student pilot’s license on his sixteenth birthday. But who was to know that this shy boy, who also loved books and...

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Bright Path

Jim Thorpe's childhood was a mix of hard work in the outdoors and a succession of military-strict "Indian Schools" that relentlessly imposed white culture on Native American children. Then in 1907, wearing overalls and a work shirt, he effortlessly broke his school high-jump record--a feat that launched a remarkable athletic career in track, football, and baseball, culminating at the 1912 Olympics, where Thorpe won the decathlon with a world...

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